SAVE ORPHANS AND DISABLED AFRICAN CHILDREN (SODAC ORGANIZATION)




SAVEORPHAN.WEBS.COM

WELCOME TO SAVE ORPHANS AND DISABLED AFRICAN CHILDREN (SODAC ORGANIZATION0)

WELCOME TO SODAC

Sodac  is an international Charity set up organization, set up in 2004.

Sodac has a clear mandate to bring hope and empower people in Africa – and put an end to systemic poverty.

This hope may come in the form of food to eat, safe water to drink, help for families infected and affected by HIV/AIDS or by empowering people to set up small businesses.Our aim is to impact one life at a time. Our long-term vision is to diversify the charity across Africa.

Remove children from the streets

Rehabilitate children and resettle them back with their closest family members

Provide material support in the form of basic necessities like shelter, food, medical care and education

Provide fun activities such as soccer, basketball, dance, drama, singing, acrobatics, etc..

Increase awareness about the life of vulnerable and street children through social media outreach

Project Hope for African understands the vast difficulty in responding to the HIV/AIDS crisis and thus has joined hands with others to fight this war. We invite you to be an active participant in this battle by supporting our programs and community outreach work. Together we can make the difference and give the youth of Africa a true change for a future.While eradication of HIV transcends the reach of any single program, or organization

Get Involved

Get Involved – Become Part of the Team

Hope Africa has six priority projects. By supporting these projects, you will know exactly where your money is going and we’ll keep you updated on the project’s progress with reports, messages and photographs. For more information, contact FRED KABOGOZA on +256774308059 +256773070135  +256788833553

Our tagline at SODAC, is “off the streets and on their feet.” Our goal is to provide street children and vulnerable children with rehabilitation, support and resettlement services. Right now our activities are primarily in Kampala, Uganda. We have a home and center where children from all over the slums come and participate in our activities and have a chance to enjoy life as a child. Our activities include Educating them, giving the shelter, teaching them how to sing dance, acrobatics and other activities that  we can participate in as a family and across African Countries. Currently there are 16 boys who live and sleep in the home. There are more than 50 other children who come from the streets and slums that we help. These are children who lives on the streets with no one to take care of them and with no one to cater for his/her welfare, such children are abandoned, rejected and neglected and society considers him/her as a detriment to the community or dangerous to society. Such children might be victims of war, natural disaster, domestic violence, parents died of HIV/AIDS or absolute poverty in the family.
SODAC is deeply concerned with the increasing number of street children and our primary objective is to instill happiness and hope to vulnerable and street children.

The children of African countries are in great need

SODAC PROJECT wants to be part of the solution - no matter how small.

We want to help the child victims and give them a safe and secure home in orphanages which truly care, and give them an education. In so doing they will develop a value system that works towards prevention of AIDS and sustainable development of their country. These children will grow up to be the future generation of leaders of their nation. They will have the attitude to make their nation self-sufficient and hence make a positive contribution to the world.

 

Extract from the UNICEF Report on AIDS July 2004:

Sub-Saharan Africa is home to 24 of the 25 countries with the world’s highest levels of HIV prevalence, and the fastest growing proportions and absolute numbers of orphaned children. Between 1990 and 2003, the number of children orphaned by AIDS increased from less than one million to an estimated 12.6 million. Nine out of 10 children living with HIV/AIDS are African, as are eight of every 10 children who have lost parents to AIDS.

Orphans are concentrated in certain countries, reflecting broader trends in HIV prevalence and population. In five countries in southern Africa, 15 per cent or more of orphans lost one or both parents in 2003, the large majority of them due to AIDS. Equally high numbers of children are now living with chronically ill family members and will become orphans this year.

Even without the impact of HIV/AIDS, sub-Saharan Africa already had the largest proportion of orphaned children. In 2003, 12.3 per cent (43 million) of all children in the region were orphans, nearly double the 7.3 per cent of children in Asia, and 6.2 per cent of children in Latin America and the Caribbean, who were orphans.

Botswana has the highest rate of orphaning (20%). In 11 of the 43 countries in the region, more than 15 per cent of children are orphans. Of these 11 countries, AIDS is the cause of parental death between 11 and 78 per cent of the time.

The impact of HIV/AIDS on mortality and the number of children orphaned by AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa will continue to increase through 2010. By then, more than one in five children will be orphaned in Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland and Zimbabwe
 

SAVE ORPHANS AND DISABLED AFRICAN CHILDREN (sodac)

PROJECTS LIKE;-

Remove children from the streets

Rehabilitate children and resettle them back with their closest family members

Provide material support in the form of basic necessities like shelter, food, medical care and education

Provide fun activities such as soccer, basketball, dance, drama, singing, acrobatics, etc..

Increase awareness about the life of vulnerable and street children through social media outreach

Project Hope for African understands the vast difficulty in responding to the HIV/AIDS crisis and thus has joined hands with others to fight this war. We invite you to be an active participant in this battle by supporting our programs and community outreach work. Together we can make the difference and give the youth of Africa a true change for a future.

While eradication of HIV transcends the reach of any single program, or organization reducing the threat and the consequences of the virus so the future of younger generations are no longer overshadowed by this threat is the vision guiding all our efforts. PHA believes that supporting these young people in their successful transition into productive and engaged adulthood can have a big impact on the countries’ progress and growth. Furthermore, our programs incorporate the building of a tolerant and caring society for those, today and tomorrow, already infected or affected by HIV/AIDS.

The HIV/AIDS pandemic is one of the greatest global threats in the world today. Africa is the epicenter of this crisis – home to just over 10% of the world’s population, but nearly two-thirds of those living with HIV/AID worldwide. In 2006 alone, more than 2 million Africans died of AIDS. Since the beginning of the pandemic, over 20 million Africans have died of AIDS.

SODAC is deeply concerned with the increasing number of street children and our primary objective is to instill happiness and hope to vulnerable and street children.

Our activities include Educating them, giving the shelter, teaching them how to sing dance, acrobatics and other activities that  we can participate in as a family and across African Countries. Currently there are 16 boys who live and sleep in the home.

Our activities include Educating them, giving the shelter, teaching them how to sing dance, acrobatics and other activities that  we can participate in as a family and across African Countries. Currently there are 16 boys who live and sleep in the home.

valuing a diverse workforce. Diversity to Save orphans and disabled African children means difference, variety, a multiplicity. Save Orphans and Disabled African Children as an organization is committed to building and Save Orphans and Disabled African Children is committed to promoting diversity by taking a unified approach to addressing inequality caused by discrimination on the grounds of gender, disability, ethnicity, class, caste, language, religion and other facets of identity such as age or sexuality. Save Orphans and Disabled African Children considers difference to be a positive human attribute that enriches all our lives and we aim to challenge inequality and discrimination wherever we find it.

AMAZING AND DEVELOPMENT IN UGANDA

AMAZING New Developments in Uganda

Perhaps under normal circumstances a few new buildings, gardens and fruit trees wouldn’t be such a big deal, too bad the children in Kampala live in anything but “normal” conditions.

In a world where children roam the streets homeless and helpless, and people are desperate for food, CHRF is working to build a self-sufficient community. A concept near unimaginable in most of Africa.

Our Project leader on the ground, Caleb Rukundo, reported to us the exciting new resources including housing for homeless children, farming, fencing and gardening.

Although the Ugandan forests are overflowing with fruits the locals don’t often take advantage of the food by storing them for the off-season. Thankfully, Caleb and his team are saving the harvest for later in the year when the children usually would have been starving!

“We are planting many fruit trees around the compound and peas, nuts, bananas, maize, sweet potatoes and pumpkins are among the different foods growing on site”.

The new structure and home for the children was an incredible blessing to all of the local community. Desperate children and orphans now have a place to stay and can escape the dangerous and filthy water during flood season.

THE CHILDREN STILL NEED YOUR HELP. Many of the children have been diagnosed with Malaria and other deadly diseases.

WITH YOUR HELP WE CAN CONTINUE TO WORK TOGETHER TO SAVE THE LIVES OF CHILDREN IN UGANDA AND AROUND THE WORLD.

Zzana Community Children’s Center

Zzana Community Children’s Center in Uganda is home to almost 400 children. While most of the children don’t live at the school, for many this is nevertheless the only home they know. The majority of students are orphans. Some may have a frail grandparent left, some were taken in by neighbors or friends, and some live on their own, often caring for younger siblings. All of them come from extremely poor backgrounds where regular meals, medicine, schooling, even a clean shirt or a warm blanket are luxuries.

At Zzana the kids get all that and a lot more – they get to be children who laugh, play and dream of the future, grow up in a caring community with friends and adult mentors, and receive a solid education as well as vocational training on which to build their future. With the school located in one of the poorest communities in the area, just on the outskirts of Kampala, it is a daily struggle for the leadership at Zzana to meet all the kids physical, mental and emotional needs. But all you see when you visit is a beautiful campus and a beehive of curious, excited kids. In all the bustle, you might miss the fact that the teaching materials are hand-made, that the students don’t have any books, that the teachers work mostly with paper, pencils and their imagination.

We saw pictures of the human heart hand-drawn and labeled, charts of plants or the stars cut out and pasted on construction paper, posters of tools and animals copied from a textbook – all hand-made by the teachers because there are no books for the kids. After providing food for the kids - which is absolutely essential because most kids eat their only two meals of the day at school - and paying for staff and teachers, there is simply no money left for text books, story books, dictionaries, maps, or other educational materials.

 

Charis means "grace" in Greek --
as in the merciful kindness that saves and restores.

The orphaned children of the Makindye Community of Kampala, capital of Uganda, may not know Greek, but they do understand the miracle of a hot meal and someone who cares - which is what they receive at Charis Center. The Center provides a daily hot meal, clothing, health care and education to some 400 abandoned children, most of whose parents have died from HIV/AIDS.

Children's Hunger Relief Fund has been supporting Charis Center since the early days of its founding by the Reverend John Obokech, whose heart was moved to action over the plight of the hundreds of AIDS orphans he saw wandering the streets of his city. However, Charis Center has remained a dream in process since, until recently, there has been no facility to house the children at night. Most have been forced to return to the streets to sleep, where they are highly vulnerable to disease and exploitation.

In 2004 we moved one step closer to fulfilling the dream of providing a permanent "home of grace" to these precious children. A building was made available in Namataba, about 22 km outside of Kampala, and 54 of Makindye's children are now housed there fulltime. Another 16 orphans from the local community come to the Center during the day.

We are still dreaming, though.

The next project is a school for the Namataba community. Revered John has been asked to spearhead the effort, and a property has been identified. However, the needs remain great: for building and school supplies, teachers' salaries, other basic hygiene and medical supplies, and housing for the other 266 orphaned children still at the Makindye Center in Kampala.


Children's Hunger Relief Fund also sponsors other children's homes and programs in Uganda, including New Hope Academy.